Georgina Lewis  
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projects

we make a mark
and live in it

these things might kill me
(or you too)

transfer

#desklabor

images of a future
without care

group project; not a DNA test

Moonfarming
- an Illustrated Encyclopedia

the shut palace of the queen
- 24 HOUR POEM BARAGE

recent common ancestor

The hedge set about the
vineyard: Bumpkin Island
Border Control

sound

text

drawing

objects




Boston Center for the Arts, 2019; Photo Credit: Melissa Blackall
Acrylic paint, molded paper pulp, graphite, red USB cable. 2019.


we make a mark and live in it


if you put 2 things together and you break them you have many
if you forget about the noise there's only

signals

we make a mark and live in it


we make a mark and live in it is a site specific installation grounded in the questions “how can we develop and sustain agency in the age of technology” and “what are the benefits of so doing?” It references alchemical principles and archeology and is the outgrowth of an investigative drawing practice I began two years ago.

The installation’s 100+ multicolored small objects are made from paper pulp, a markable malleable substance that I have recently begun exploring. Their pigmentation is a reference and framework derived from alchemical theories of color and transformation. Many of them incorporate graphite, an initial and constant gesture towards mark making but also another tie to alchemy: graphite rods are used to stir melting gold.

These are experiments in what it means to step away from the false sense of security offered by computers, a sense which I think is damaging us. The risk-taking involved with actually making something (unencumbered by the defined if opaque boundaries of technology) is transformative.   The pieces range from abstract to representational: electrical plugs, alchemical symbols, good luck charms, and the delicate bones of human ears. I think of them as relics and forms: the leftovers that might remain of our civilization 200 years from now.

I’m experimenting with what it means to step away from the false sense of security offered by computers, a sense which I think is damaging us. I’ve found the risk-taking involved with actually making something (unencumbered by the defined if opaque boundaries of technology) to be transformative.

top 2 images: Boston Center for the Arts, 2019; Photo Credit: Melissa Blackall