Georgina Lewis  
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projects

these things might kill me
(or you too)

images of a future without care

#desklabor

transfer

group project; not a DNA test

Moonfarming
- an Illustrated Encyclopedia

the shut palace of the queen
- 24 HOUR POEM BARAGE

Darwin

Bumpkin Island Surveillance
Station

sound

text

drawing

objects

older work




#desklabor

My life is small and cramped;
At least that's what the mouse tells me.


To make these drawings I attached a pen to my mouse and then went about my normal "work" activities - my day job and my art practice - using various computers and peripherals (mice).

The sketches function as indicators and maps of my actions as a laborer and maker. They're not *about* the digital economy but they're reflective *of* it: constrained, monotone, reliant on technology, and sadly frantic. Like the digital economy they're also not quite what I'd expected. I anticipated long flowing circular gestures but instead of free expressive forms I got something a bit desperate. I was surprised by the apparent disconnect between what I was "doing" on screen and the associated physical motions, the former seeming so much more expansive than the latter.

For the first set of drawings, made in 2017, I completed a specific and limited set of software and computing associated tasks: using the erase tool in Photoshop or checking and reading email in Outlook. In late 2018 I restarted the project, adjusting the parameters and recording all actions over a specific hour long period to capture "an hour of my work." I think of the sketches as a form of anthropological research and love being my own subject; a sort of reworking of some of Helen Molesworth's ideas in Work Ethic by which I function as both Supervisor/User and Producer (dictating and analysing my own marks) with Adobe at the interstices draining all my cash. You can see my motions but also sometimes (literal) points of reflection: blots of varying size where the pen rested while I thought.